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Descendants of William Ayres
Submitted by Vincent Summers

Generation No. 1

 

1. WILLIAM4 AYRES (JOHN3, WILLIAM2, SAMUEL1) was born December 14, 1788 in Middle Paxtang twp., Dauphin County, Pa., and died May 26, 1856 in Harrisburg, PA. He married MARY ELIZABETH BUCHER May 06, 1817 in Harrisburg, PA by "Rev." Rauhauser, daughter of JOHN BUCHER and SUSANNA HORTER. She was born April 23, 1795 in Harrisburg, PA, and died July 31, 1847 in Harrisburg, PA.

Notes for WILLIAM AYRES:

The Photograph of a William AYRES in this William's scrapbook is most likely accurate. The time period would be right. And his son was very much into photography, and painting photographs, and so, obviously would have picked his famous father as a subject. Plus, the image that was given to me by the Historical Society of Dauphin County, PA, was part of a grouping of four with Hugh Hamilton, John Harris,

and Gen. John Kean. -Vince Summers, February 21, 1999.

Became an attorney at the Dauphin bar.

1820 PA Census:

Ayres, William DAUP 143 Middle P[axtang]

Born at the homestead in Middle Paxtang township, Dauphin Co., PA.

Quit farming for more congenial pursuits. Became citizen of Harrisburg.

Justice of Peace, Gov. Findlay, 1819. Again Justice of Peace by Gov Hiester, 1824. Admitted to bar of Dauphin Co., April 7, 1826. Elected to PA Legislature for years 1833, 1834, 1835 and was prominent in political party to which he was attached, and persistent advocate for establishment of free-school system of PA. 1841, elected director of United States Bank, at Philadelphia 1850, organized Harrisburg gas company, and became its first president. 1853, became President of Huntingdon and Broad Top railroad. 1854, projected and organized Harrisburg and Hamburg railroad company, and as president, was engaged in the field with engineers at the time of his death.

Burial: Harrisburg Cemetery, Harrisburg, PA

To quote page 61 of Volume One, Series One and Two, of Egle's Notes & Queries, concerning William Ayres...

"As was the case respecting the introduction of water and gas into Harrisburg many years in advance of the times, I must be pardoned in claiming for my father, William Ayres, the leadership of the movement which resulted in establishing the "Pennsylvania Literary, Scientific and Military Institute" -- who subscribed my name as the first one offered to make up its roll.

From his correspondence with Captain Partridge and other gentlemen of military proclivities, I glean that the matter was first proposed during the winter 1844-5. Captain Alden Partridge, who had been Superintendent of the United States Military Academy at West Point, having resigned, conceived the idea of associating military instruction and discipline with the usual collegiate education, and had made a successful test of this course at Norwich, Vermont, and Middletown, Ct., where his military schools had attained great popularity...

AFN: V2Q4-OT

One source says he died 1865, not 1856, though listing the same day and month.- DAR ID 75464 for Mrs. Eleanor Chriswell Mazuril Day.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

The Huntingdon and Broadtop RR was built by none other than William AYRES.- Jim Hoch.

Saxton was laid out as a town on land bought from Henry and David Shoup by James Saxton and Jacob Fockler of Huntingdon in 1853 and 1855. The town was a result of the building of the Huntingdon and Broad Top Railroad in 1855.

After rapid growth, Saxton was incorporated as a borough on February 14,1866, with officers listed as C. W. Moore (Chief Burgess), James L. Prince, J. A. Raum, C. S. Faxon, and S. S. Flucke. Other prominent names are: N. Hysong, patternmaker, undertaker, and constable; J. A. Eichelberger and E. Eichelberger, merchants who also operated in Hopewell; Tobias Snider, merchant; and T. C. Sanderson, train dispatcher. -Bedford County History Page.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Here is a reference:

BIOGRAPHIC ENCYCLOPEDIA of DAUPHIN COUNTY

1896 J.M. Runk & Company Publishers (Chambersburg, PA)

This contains:

AYRES, William Pages 17 (drawing), 171, 212 Born 14 Dec 1788

The World Book Encyclopedia says he [Nicholas Biddle, associated in banking with William Ayres, and who was instrumental in William's becoming a member of the board of the U.S. Bank in Philadelphia] was b. in Phila. 1786 and d. 1844. In addition to info on his banking, it says he was also a poet, scholar and statesman.- Lani McAniff.

According to Egle's Notes and Queries, concerning a letter from a General Cameron to William, it says General Cameron, who lived at the time across from William Ayres, lived at 223 Market Street.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

John's son William [this William] was involved with the welcoming party that greeted Lafayette when he made his grand return tour of the US, I believe in 1824. The Marquis brought his son along for the visit. I read that somewhere in Egle.- Jim HOCH..

William B., p.250 HARRISBURG WATER WORKS. <last paragraph>

"The following is a list of the members of the Town Council who authorized

and commenced the construction of the water works: Valentine Hummel, Sr.,

President; George J. Shoemaker, Clerk; John Knepley, Sr. William Catrell,

William Ayres, George S. Kemble, William B. Johnson, Michael Burke, Samuel

Pool." -----appr. April 18, 1841 the water works was completed)

*****

Here is a brief biography about Nicholas Biddle, based on the Encyclopedia Britannica Article:

Born: January 8, 1786, Philadelphia

Died: February 27, 1844, Philadelphia

Secretary to President James Monroe: 1806-07

Minister to England

Wrote: History of the Expedition of Captains Lewis and Clark (1914)

President of the Second Bank of the United States 1823-1836, making it the first effective central bank in US History.

Antagonist to President Andrew Jackson, eventually leading to the termination of the bank.

Helped establish Girard College.

*****

Notes for MARY ELIZABETH BUCHER:

Buried in Harrisburg cemetery.

Married, first, John Swift, of New York.

Marriage Notes for WILLIAM AYRES and MARY BUCHER:

Historical Society of Dauphin County Record says 6th of May, 1817. Day mentioned was Tuesday, which would be correct, since other reference said 16th, which would not be a Tuesday. (Other reference was LDS). Harrisburg Chronicle was the Weekly paper printing this on May 19, 1817. A Monday.

 

Children of WILLIAM AYRES and MARY BUCHER are:

2. i. BUCHER5 AYRES, b. February 03, 1818, Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania; d. Bet. 1876 - 1900.

ii. JOHN AYRES, b. September 16, 1819, Harrisburg, PA; d. September 17, 1821, Harrisburg, PA.

Notes for JOHN AYRES:

Buried in old Dauphin graveyard.

One source lists different birthdate:

John, son of William & M.E. b. 9/11/1819 d. 9/17/1821

*** pages 7 & 8 in "Early Lutheran Records from Dauphin Co., PA" by Phillip Rice and Jean Delock

 

 

 

 

 

iii. MARY ELIZABETH AYRES, b. June 08, 1821, Harrisburg, PA; d. WFT Est. 1849-1915; m. JAMES ANDERSON, June 20, 1843, Harrisburg, PA; b. March 07, 1812, Silver Springs T, Cumberland, Pennsylvania; d. December 15, 1882, Silver Springs T, Cumberland, Pennsylvania.

Notes for MARY ELIZABETH AYRES:

AFN:V2Q5-VG This designation lists the birth year as 1823, not 1821, month and day the same.

3. iv. WILLIAM AYRES, JR., b. March 08, 1823, Harrisburg, PA; d. 1898.

4. v. SUSAN BUCHER AYRES, b. October 06, 1826, Harrisburg, PA; d. October 07, 1861, Harrisburg, PA.

5. vi. GEORGE BUCHER AYRES, b. February 12, 1829, Harrisburg, PA; d. Abt. 1906, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

6. vii. ELIZA JANE AYRES, b. January 10, 1831; d. May 10, 1879.

7. viii. JOHN BEGGS AYRES, b. February 27, 1835, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; d. January 13, 1890, Reynoldsville, Pennsylvania.

 

Generation No. 2

 

2. BUCHER5 AYRES (WILLIAM4, JOHN3, WILLIAM2, SAMUEL1) was born February 03, 1818 in Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, and died Bet. 1876 - 1900. He married (1) JANE ALICE LYON. He married (2) JANE ALICE LYON April 11, 1854 in Spruce Creek Presbyterian Church, daughter of JOHN LYON and MARGARET STEWART. She was born March 24, 1829 in Pennsylvania Furnace, Huntington Co., Pennsylvania.

Notes for BUCHER AYRES:

"Baptized by Rev. N. R. Snowden; educated in the schools of the city and at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA; commence civil engineering on State works; entered the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad Co. on the opening September 1, 1849; appointed Superintendent of the

Memphis and Charleston Railroad, residence, Memphis, in 1854, and continued until 1861, when he removed to Centre county, Pa., and

in 1872 removed to Philadelphia. Appointed by Daniel Webster, Secretary of State, to his Department, Washington city, and detailed as

Secretary to the Commissioners from Main and Massachusetts in the negotiation of the Webster-Ashburton Treaty of 1842. Appointed

August 19, 1848, Aid de Camp, with the rank of Lieut. Colonel, by Governor Wm. F. Johnston;"

Married by "Rev. Daniel L. Hughes, of Spruce Creek Presbyterian church".Of Philadelphia, iron manufacturer, McKeesport, Pa. residence Dravosburg, Allegheny co., Pa.

*****

The Philadelphia Directory of 1890 lists a Bucher Ayres as having his home at 805 N 17th. This is what the 1891-1892 Boyd's Blue Book says about Bucher Ayres:

Ayres, Bucher 805 N. 17th, summer residence Penna Furnace, Huntington County, PA; also - 805 Seventeenth Street North - Mr. and Mrs Bucher Ayres & drs.

Now the above obviously means daughters, and not doctors, and since Bucher Ayres Jr was not married until 1892, and his one known daughter was born after that date, the references must be to Bucher Ayres, Sr.- VES.

*****

Colonel Bucher Ayres, also residing in Philadelphia, who made a broad reputation as a railroad manager, was the first person appointed a passenger conductor for the Pennsylvania Railroad. - Egle's Notes & Queries

This could apply to this Bucher Ayres, or it could apply to his son, or, for that matter, in a sense, to both:

For Centre County, there is a farm listed in the National Register, on a Bucher Ayres farm, Ferguson Township at Whitehall Rd., SW Pine Grove Mills, listed 1980, as seen on the world-wide web at: http://www.centrecountyhistory.org/urlist.htm (or possibly html).- VES.

Hi Vince,

We have a book at the Centre County Library which has two pages on the Bucher Ayers farm. The name of the book is Historic Buildings of Centre County, Pennsylvania done by the Historic Registration Project. Copyright 1980. I would be happy to copy it and mail it to you. I work in the Pa Room of the Library. Let me know if you would like a copy. (Picture of the house included.)

Joyce Adgate

**********

Unknown if these have any connection whatsoever, but list them, just in case:

Centre Co Marriages book 1800 - 1850 book

Spelling is AYERS no Ayres listed

1844 ~ Nov. 14, 1844

Andrew Ayers and Mrs. Susan Horn (dtr of Peter Smith) both of Clinton Co, Pa m. by Rev. John Ball Ref. Source: Centre Democrat 12/25 (Document in Centre Co. Library)

From "Centre Co. Death Records ~ 1852 - 1854 and 1893 - 1905

Ayers, Eliza, f, age 72 y. 3 mo., (no parents listed) married, no place of birth or occupation listed., died Apr. 22, 1895 in Union twp, died of Heart Disease, buried Union Cem.

Ayres, Carrie, f, age 28 (no parents listed) married, born: Runn Till, no occupation listed, died Feb. 26, 1900 in Spring Twp, cause of death: confinement, buried in Forge Cem.

Ayres, infant, no age, parents Joseph & Carrie, Place of birth: Furnace, died Feb. 26, 1900 in Spring Twp., no cause of death listed, interred at Forge Cem.

Ayres, Myron, m., age 40, (no parents listed) he was single and occupation: Lab, d. April 24, 1904 at Philipsburg, of smallpox and buried in Philipsburg.

From my "Centre Co. Newspaper death Notices 1821 - 1869 book"

1857 BUCHER, Julia A. (Miss) Feb. 25, 1857 at Conrad House, Bellefonte, Age 42 yr 7 mo. 21 da. Twin sister of Capt. Morrison's wife.

Ref. Source: Democratic Watchman Mar. 4, 1857

**********

Egle's Notes and Queries says:

THE PASSENGER DEPARTMENT, Pennsylvania Railroad, who organized it, is given by our friend William B. Wilson, who edits the "Pennsylvania Railroad Men's News." Mr. Wilson writes: "Mr. Lewis L. Haupt and Mr. George B. Ayres, now residing in Philadelphia, organized the Passenger Department, the former holding the position of General Ticket Agent, and the latter as Assistant. Up to 1852 these gentlemen handled the entire passenger ticket account without assistance. In that year the business had increased to such a point that a third person became necessary. They were highly educated, Christian men, standing high in the communities in which they resided, and worked indefatigably for the success of the road. Mr. Ayres, in addition to being a thorough business man, had quiet literary tastes, many musical accomplishments, and was an artist of more than ordinary merit. His brother, Colonel Bucher Ayres, also residing in Philadelphia, who made a broad reputation as a railroad manager, was the first person appointed a passenger conductor for the Pennsylvania Railroad. The Messrs. Ayres' father was William Ayres, of Harrisburg, noted in his day as leading in all progressive movements in his locality."

 

BUCHER AYRES HOUSE (Taken from an Historical Society Publication):

The Iron Industry and Farming (after timbering) were important functions in Centre County, PA.

Bucher Ayres had spent years in the Railroading Industry.

He farmed in Ferguson Township from 1860 to 1870, in a residence built in 1858 that was a wedding gift of his father-in-law. John Lyon had already timbered the land for charcoal for Pennsylvania Furnace. Bucher Ayres, after 10 years at this farmhouse, turned back to railroading, and left this house, returning to Phialdelphia, and leasing the farm.

There was a book written by Bucher Ayres on the history of the Stewart Family. This was the family of his mother-in-law, and goes back to the royal house of Stewart. One person transcribed a copy of his book, and added her own notes -- Minnehaha Finney. This woman was from Kansas at the time. Here is a brief history of her life, as told by a relative:

Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Finney.

(1) MINNEHAHA. Born at Pittsburg, Indiana, January 24, 1867. She has given close attention to educational work, from the elementary principles until she closed her college career. She graduated in the High School at Beloit, Kansas, in 1886, in a class of fifteen, receiving one half the first honor. She delivered the salutatory address and was given scholarship in Adrian College, Michigan. After teaching school successfully for a few years, she entered Tarkio College, at Tarkio, Missouri, in 1888, and in three years graduated in the scientific course—in June, 1891. Again the honor was accredited to her of delivering the salutatory address. The following year she taught in the Public Schools at Red Oak, Iowa. In the fall of 1892 she went to Knoxville, Tennessee, to teach in the College for the Freedmen in that city. This position she filled quite acceptably and creditably to herself for two years. In 1894 she was appointed by the Board of Foreign Missions of the United Presbyterian Church as a missionary to Egypt. This appointment was accepted, and making all necessary arrangements without delay, she sailed from New York, October 15, 1894, in company with others, for her new field of labor. Upon her arrival in Egypt she commenced at once the study of the Arabic language, anxious to be ready to enter fully on her work in that needy field, at an early day. A portion of her time from the first was taken up as teacher of the English language. She has since made commendable progress in acquiring the language of the country, and is now engaged as principal of the girls' school at Monsoura, Egypt. Her work is very important and far-reaching. May she have abundant success in her labor of love for the Master.

Note: Horrifically, Minnehaha went through a horror as a child. Here is the story, as told by the same family member:

Mr. Finney was a farmer. His home was near Mansfield, Ohio. His death will be portrayed under the heading of

A TERRIBLE TRAGEDY.

It was Thursday night, December 6, 1877. The weather was cold and bracing. There were two families occupying the house of William Finney, living in different apartments. After the usual family devotions, each family had retired to rest;—the son, Rev. J.P. Finney, a little earlier than common. Very soon all were quiet and in the enjoyment of peaceful slumber.

Away in the dead of the night a strange noise was heard by the younger family, in the room where the aged couple had retired for repose. Mrs. Finney supposing that some one was sick, quickly arose, approached the door which led to the room where the old folks slept, found it open and saw the outline of a man; but, not recognizing him as a stranger, went on, and in a moment was struck and felled to the floor in an unconscious state.

Then a rush was made for the bedroom where she and her husband slept. He had just risen in his bed, when he was struck a terrible blow on his side, breaking the butt of the gun. When, in a moment, he saw a second stroke about to follow, he grasped the musket; and in the struggle for life, wrenched it from the hands of the would be assassin. In the struggle, however, he received a severe blow just over the right eye. At this juncture, Mr. Finney, supposing his wife to have been killed, ran quickly up-stairs to arouse a hired man and prepare if necessary for a further defense. His daughter, Minnehaha, then only ten years of age, was lying on a lounge near the stairway. With a lamp in his hand, in search of Mr. Finney, she distinctly saw the face of a negro man who lived in the neighborhood,—one she knew well too. She plainly heard him say "Where is he gone?" and, strange though it may seem, she kept perfectly quiet.

It was feared that the intruder had accomplices, and that he was not alone in his nefarious work. So the two up-stairs talked loudly about the use of revolvers and muskets, though no such weapons were in their possession. This is supposed to have frightened the colored man, and so he soon decamped, as he entered the house, through a raised kitchen window.

In the meantime a window was raised in the room above, and the cry of murder, oft repeated, reverberated through the stillness of the night to arouse if possible some one in the neighborhood. In a little time the men went down-stairs, and when the younger Mrs. Finney, coming

to consciousness, saw the face of her husband covered with blood, she exclaimed, "Mr. Finney, what does this mean?" Herbert, their oldest son, then only about nine years of age, asked his mother what they should do. She replied, "We can only pray." He said at once, "I have been praying." Mrs. Finney had a cut on her head of two or three inches, inflicted by the blow of a musket.

On going into the bedroom below they found the elder Mr. Finney lying in an unconscious state, clotted over with blood, yet still breathing. His wife, unconscious too, was wandering about in an adjoining room and calling feebly for help. There was a terrible gash across the left side of her face, from which the blood still continued to flow. Such was the state of things in the usually quiet home of Wm. S. Finney and son, a little past midnight of December 7, 1877.

The hired man was sent at once to give the alarm among the neighbors. Dr. Craig, the family physician, was promptly summoned; the police of Mansfield were informed of what had taken place and their services requested without delay. The physician arrived at 2:30 a.m., just in time to see Mr. Finney breathe his last. Mrs. Finney, having received a fearful blow on her face, complained of a feeling of chilliness, and but little could be done for her, except to restore natural heat, until the next day. For several days she seemed unconscious of what had taken place, or what was going on around her. Crowds gathered at this home early the following morning to ascertain the character of the injuries received, to give needful help and show sympathy for the afflicted families. The funeral, arranged for Saturday, the ninth, was largely attended and the body quietly laid to peaceful rest in the Mansfield Cemetery.

The object in breaking into the house was evidently money. A few hogs had been driven to market on Thursday, and it was no doubt supposed by the robber, that Mr. Finney had money in the house. But the attempt to secure money proved an entire failure.

The name of the negro was Edward Webb. It had snowed a little during the night, and he was tracked across the field to his very door in Mansfield, the next morning, and he was arrested the same day about nine o'clock a.m. The people becoming very much excited, there was danger of mob violence. The family, however, very wisely urged that only lawful measures be resorted to for the punishment of the offender. When the trial took place, the chief witness against the accused was Miss Minnehaha Finney, then only in her eleventh year. She previously knew the man well, saw him distinctly by the light of the lamp, and showed a great deal of tact and sagacity, for one of her

age, in giving testimony. There was also very strong circumstantial evidence brought forward against the accused. When the trial was ended the jury promptly brought in a verdict of "guilty of murder in the first degree." Accordingly he was sentenced to death by the presiding Judge, to take place May 31, 1878. When the time arrived the sentence was put into execution. Thus ends the most terrible tragedy in our family history, and may there never be, while time lasts, the occurrence of another like it.

Since the death of her husband Cousin Sarah Finney has made her home with her son, R.N. Stewart. Her death took place near Mansfield, Ohio, September 7, 1896, in the seventy-seventh year of her age. She was for many years a conscientious, active member of the United Presbyterian Church. --Elizabeth Richardson, Ketchikan, Alaska erich@ktn.net

George Bucher Ayres, in the 1900 Notes and Queries of Dr. William Henry Egle, refers to his eldest brother, Bucher, as deceased. So, not only did he die on or before 1900, but he was the oldest brother, implying at least one other besides George.- VES.

Notes for JANE ALICE LYON:

Ancestral File says born Pittsburgh, PA. AFN:V2Q7-WW

I am trying to obtain a copy of a daguerrotype taken by Lyonel Ayres, as illustrated below, and mention discovered on a webpage on September 16, 2000...

Jane Alice Lyon of Pennsylvania Furnace -- Sepia Print from a Daguerrotype original photo = 1853 --- copied in 1891 by Lyonel Ayres.- In possession of Bob King.

Ordered September 20, 2000!

Marriage Notes for BUCHER AYRES and JANE LYON:

Pennsylvania Furnace, according to LDS.

 

Children of BUCHER AYRES and JANE LYON are:

8. i. CLEONIE6 AYRES, b. September 25, 1855, Memphis, Tennessee; d. Aft. 1891.

ii. ANNIE LYON AYRES, b. February 01, 1857, Memphis, Tennessee; d. April 01, 1875, Philadelphia.

Notes for ANNIE LYON AYRES:

Buried in Mt. Vernon cemetery.

Mount Vernon Cemetery

Ridge & Lehigh Ave.

Philadelphia, PA 19132

215-229-6038

iii. LYONEL AYRES, b. September 04, 1858, Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee; d. November 24, 1939; m. (ANN AMELIA)?.

Notes for LYONEL AYRES:

Civil Engineer, residence Duluth Minnesota.

On this site, Guide to the NEMHC's Collection, 1988, was found the following:

AYRES, LYONEL (1858-1939). Papers, 1888-1922. 2 items. One letter written to Ayres's brother and a 1922 certificate from the Minnesota State Board of Architects and Engineers concerning the strike activities in Duluth during the year 1888, 1922. S3184.

.i.Ayres, Lyonel, letter;

It's URL was: www.d.umn.edu/~dhansen/nemhc/guide.html

Possibly, only, these could be family, as they are the AYRES deaths in St. Louis County, Minnesota for 1950-1974

St. Louis County MN Death Index 1950-1974:

Surname Given Name Middle Date of Death Certificate No. Location

AYRES ELSIE NA 10/14/1972 1028

1900-1924:

AYRES JOHN NA 1/3/1919 6424 ELY

AYRES WILLIAM G.T. 10/23/1923 6745 ELY

1924-1949:

AYRES ANN AMELIA 5/28/1936 5478 ELY

AYRES LYONEL NA 11/24/1939 1030

Lyonel Ayres was involved in a dispute involving the boundary line between the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin! Here are the details:

U.S. Supreme Court

MINNESOTA v. WISCONSIN, 258 U.S. 149 (1922)

258 U.S. 149

The STATE OF MINNESOTA

v.

The STATE OF WISCONSIN.

No. 11

, original.

Submitted January 30, 1922

Decree entered February 27, 1922

Messrs. Lyndon A. Smith, Charles R. Pierce, of Washington, D. C., Clifford L. Hilton, and Frank B. Kellogg, both of St. Paul, Minn., H. B. Fryberger, and William D. Bailey, both of Duluth, Minn., and C. Louis Weeks, of St. Paul, Minn., for the State of Minnesota.

Messrs. Walter C. Owen, of Maiden Rock, Wis., Walter Drew, of Milwaukee, Wis., M. B. Olbrich, of Madison, Wis., and John J. Blaine, of Boscobel, Wis., for the State of Wisconsin. [258 U.S. 149, 150]

PER CURIAM.

The state of Minnesota having made a motion before the court for a final decree, confirming the report of the commissioners appointed by the decree in this cause on the 11th day of October, A. D. 1920, to run, locate, and designate the boundary line between the state of Minnesota and the state of Wisconsin, in and through Lower St. Louis Bay, Upper St. Louis Bay and the St. Louis river, from Upper St. Louis Bay to the falls in said river, which report is in words and figures, as follows:

'To the Honorable Chief Justice and the Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States:

'We, Samuel S. Gannett, Washington, D. C., William B. Patton, Duluth, Minn., and John G. D. Mack, Madison, Wisconsin, commissioners appointed, under decree of the court rendered October 11, 1920, 'to run, locate, and designate the boundary line between the state of Minnesota and the state of Wisconsin, in and through Lower St. Louis Bay, Upper St. Louis Bay, and the St. Louis river, from Upper St. Louis Bay to the 'Falls' in the said river,' have the honor to submit the following report, with accompanying maps, which maps are marked Exhibit No. 1, entitled 'Supreme Court of the United States, October Term, 1920, No. 13, Original, Tracing of Parts of Original Map of St. Louis Bay and St. Louis River, Made under Direction of Captain George G. Meade, T. E. 1861, Showing Boundary Line Between Minnesota and Wisconsin as Surveyed in Accordance with Terms of Above Decree in 1921,' and Exhibit No. 2, entitled 'Supreme Court of the United States, October Term, 1920, No. 13, Original, Map Showing Boundary Line Between Minnesota and Wisconsin Through St. Louis Bay and up St. Louis River to the Falls as Surveyed in Accordance with Terms of Above Decree in 1921.' [258 U.S. 149, 151] 'Organization.

'The commissioners held their first meeting on October 29, 1920, in suite 612, Palladio Building, in the city of Duluth, Minnesota, and organized by electing Samuel S. Gannett chairman.

'Meade Chart.

'In carrying out the decree of the court, that the 'boundary line must be ascertained upon a consideration of the situation existing in 1846, and accurately described by the Meade chart,' the commission made a careful study of the Meade chart, filed as Minnesota's Exhibit No. 1, and found that the scale of said chart, 1:32000, was too small for practical use in determining a line which could be laid out and properly monumented, and that the triangulation points of the original Meade survey, shown on the original Meade map (the location of which was absolutely essential in transferring to the ground points determined on the map), were omitted from the chart.

'Meade Map.

'An attempt was then made to use the photographic copies of the original Meade map, being Wisconsin's Exhibits Nos. 46C and 46D, but it was found that the process of production had caused unequal shrinkage in the several sheets composing the map, and that no accurate scalings could be made therefrom.

'Under instructions of the commission, Mr. S. S. Gannett went to the office of the United States Lake Survey, in the city of Detroit, Michigan, the repository of the original Meade map, and under his personal supervision caused an accurate tracing to be made of so much of the said Meade map, and the soundings and triangulation points shown thereon, as pertains to the case under considera- [258 U.S. 149, 152] tion. An accurate copy of this tracing, showing in addition the boundary line, as fixed on said map by the commission, is filed herewith as Exhibit No. 1.

'Triangulation Points.

'The triangulation points, heretofore noted as being platted on the original Meade map by triangles, and shown in red ink on the aforesaid tracing, are located, in the records of the Lake Survey, by rectangular co-ordinates referred to the primary triangulation station of the United States Lake Survey, known as 'Minnesota Point North Base,' drawn in red ink on aforesaid tracing, and described hereinafter in detail under the heading, 'Descriptions and Geographic Positions of Triangulation and Reference Points.' Commissioner Gannett secured an accurate copy of said coordinates from the official records of the United States Lake Survey, and they are correctly given in table No. 1, attached to this report.

'The original Meade triangulation points have not been in existence for some years, but the Corps of Engineers, United States Army, in later surveys of the St. Louis Bays and river, has established new triangulation points and referred the same by rectangular co- ordinates to aforesaid 'Minnesota Point North Base.' An accurate copy of the official coordinates of these later triangulation points was also secured by Commissioner Gannett, and a true copy of same is hereto attached and marked table No. 2.

'With these co-ordinates it is possible to accurately relocate the original Meade triangulation points, or to show the new ones on the Meade map in their true positions, and the last-mentioned points are thus shown on Exhibit No. 1, being marked by triangles in black ink.

'Having the existing, or new, triangulation points platted in their true positions on the Meade map, it is possible to 'tie in' by scale any points or lines on said map to these triangulation points, and to transfer said points [258 U.S. 149, 153] or lines to the ground by similar measurements from said triangulation points.

'Office Procedure.

'With this information at hand, the commission laid down on the tracing of the original Meade map, Exhibit No. 1, the boundary line between the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin, in accordance with the decree of the court, namely: 'From a point midway between Rice's Point and Connor's Point, through the middle of Lower St. Louis Bay, to and with the deep channel leading to Upper St. Louis Bay, and to a point therein immediately south of the southern extremity of Grassy Point; thence westward along the most direct course, through water not less than eight feet deep eastward of Fisherman's Island, as indicated by the red trace A, B, C on Minnesota's Exhibit No. 1, approximately one mile to the deep channel and immediately west of the bar therein, thence with such channel north and west of Big Island upstream to the 'Falls."

'The center of the pivot pier of the Interstate Bridge was found to be the point midway between Rice's Point and Connor's Point, and was designated by the commission as station No. O. From this point, as a beginning, a series of straight lines was laid out to conform with the decree of the court, special care being taken to have the lines over water not less than eight feet deep as shown by the Meade map, and the angle points between said lines numbered consecutively.

'From such of these angle points as were convenient 'ties' were scaled to the best situated triangulation points on the map, and by means of rectangular co-ordinates from each angle point on the lines between the 'ties,' to triangulation points, the lengths and angles of deviation of the several lines were calculated, and closed polygons formed. These polygons were then checked as [258 U.S. 149, 154] to closure by the method of latitudes and departures, and any errors found were balanced so as to secure closure. By this means your commissioners were enabled, with a close approach to accuracy, to determine the lengths and angles of deviation of the several lines composing the projected boundary line.

'The lengths and angles thus determined and the 'ties' to the several triangulation points were used as preliminary field notes by the surveying party employed to 'run out the boundary line and to locate same by proper monuments, courses and distances.'

'Boundary Line Above Fond du Lac.

'For that portion of the St. Louis river beyond Fond du Lac, and extending to the 'Falls,' and which is not shown on the Meade chart or map, the commission established the center line of the river, as a medial line between the shore lines, as surveyed by the commission, and designated said medial line as the boundary line.

'The Survey.

'As the boundary line, except in a few instances, runs over water from 8 feet to over 20 feet in depth, the most convenient time for surveying it was after ice had formed to a safe thickness. The winter proved to be mild and the ice conditions unfavorable, adding greatly to the danger and difficulty of the work, and increasing the time necessary to finish it.

'The surveying party was organized early in January, 1921, and the necessary equipment was rented or purchased. Starting at station O, heretofore described, the approximate position of the boundary line was laid out on the ice, in the bay and river, from the preliminary field notes, and the 'ties' to the triangulation points, measured. Such discrepancies, due to the curvature of the earth, or to errors in scaling from the map, as were [258 U.S. 149, 155] shown by measuring the 'ties,' were allowed for and distributed in the angles and distances of all the lines back to the preceding 'tie.' If any important discrepancy was discovered, the lines involved were re-run before any adjustments were made, From the final field notes of the adjusted survey, a description of the boundary line by courses and distances was obtained, and is incorporated herein. This work was completed March 19, 1921.

'Detailed Description of Boundary Line.

'[Here follow lengthy and detailed descriptions of the boundary line, as determined, the monuments, and of triangulation and reference points, with geographic positions, which are omitted by the reporter as not being of general interest. Persons interested in these may consult the original decree in the clerk's office, obtain certified copies, or consult the copies forwarded to the Governors of the two states.]

'Map of Boundary Line.

'The commission has prepared, and transmits herewith as Exhibit No. 2, a map of St. Louis Bays and river on the scale of 1:24000, showing their present conditions, improvements along the harbor front, the United States government harbor lines and channels, and the relative position of the boundary line. There are also shown as submaps, on larger scale, improved or partly improved properties which are crossed by the boundary line; also detailed drawings of the concrete monuments as constructed.

'Tables.

'The rectangular co-ordinates, referred to Minnesota Point North Base, of all monuments, reference points, and line points, are shown in tables Nos. 2, 4 and 5, hereto attached.

'The geographic positions of the angle points is the boundary line are shown in table No. 6. [258 U.S. 149, 156] 'Instruments.

'The instrument used in making the survey was a transit theodolite with 6 1/2-inch circle and reading to 10 seconds of arc. The measurements were made on the surface of the ice with a steel tape 300 feet in length, under a tension of 20 pounds, and corrected to temperature of 62řF.

'Personnel.

'The commission employed as assistants the following named persons, namely:

'Gordon F. Daggett, Madison, Wisconsin, consulting engineer.

'Lyonel Ayres, Duluth, Minnesota, consulting engineer.

'D. W. Van Vleck, Superior, Wisconsin, consulting engineer.

'Paul Lillard, Madison, Wisconsin, transit man, in charge of field party.

'Edwin O. Anderson, Duluth, Minn., chairman.

'Frank Kieserling, Duluth, Minn., chairman.

'Frank Suech, Jr., Duluth, Minn., rodman.

'Robert Case, Duluth, Minn., rodman.

'Robert Sansted, Duluth, Minn., rodman.

'Ray Mapp, Duluth, Minn., draughtsman.

'Eusebe J. Blais, Duluth, Minn., draughtsman.

'Finances.

'We return herewith a financial statement showing in detail the money actually expended in carrying out the terms of the decree of the court.

'Record Books.

'All field, computation, and record books have been placed in the custody of the chairman of the commission, [258 U.S. 149, 157] and filed by him in the office of the Geological Survey, Interior Department, Washington, D. C.

'Respectfully submitted.

'Samuel S. Gannett,

'William B. Patton,

'John G. D. Mack,

'Commissioners.

'June 25th, 1921.'

The cause coming on to be heard upon said motion of the said state of Minnesota:

It is hereby ordered, adjudged, and decreed that said report of said commission, filed in the office of the clerk of this court on August 5, 1921, is in all respects confirmed.

It is further ordered, adjudged, and decreed that the line as delineated and set forth in said report, and upon the two maps accompanying said report, being marked, respectively, Exhibits 1 and 2 by said commission, and which line has been marked by permanent monuments as stated in said report, be and the same is hereby established, declared, and decreed to be the true boundary line between the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin, and said maps so marked as aforesaid as Exhibits 1 and 2 are directed to be filed as a part of this decree; and it appearing that the expenses and compensation of the commissioners attendant upon the discharge of their duties amounts to $15,626.06, it is ordered that the same be allowed and approved as a part of the costs of this suit, to be borne equally by the parties, and

that the sum of $2,560, the expense of printing the record in this case, and the sum of $230, the expense of printing the report of the commissioners in this case, amounting in the aggregate to $2,790, are allowed and approved as a part of the costs [258 U.S. 149, 158] of this suit to be borne equally by the parties, and if one of them has paid more than one-half of such sums, it shall be reimbursed by the other for such excess.

It is further ordered that the clerk of this court do transmit to the respective Governors of the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin copies of this decree, duly authenticated under the seal of this court, omitting from said copies the two maps filed with the report.

Motion for a final decree granted. For final decree see 258 U.S. 149 , 42 Sup. Ct. 591, 66 L. Ed. --.

 

Notes for (ANN AMELIA)?:

This is a stab in the dark. She is listed in the death index along with Lyonel, but only because of alphabetical order. Put no faith in it. It is merely a possibility for research.- VES.

iv. MARY BUCHER AYRES, b. November 20, 1860, Centre Co., PA.

Notes for MARY BUCHER AYRES:

D.A.R.

v. JANE LYON AYRES, b. May 24, 1862, Centre Co., PA; d. WFT Est. 1863-1956.

Notes for JANE LYON AYRES:

D.A.R.

9. vi. BUCHER AYRES, JR., b. November 18, 1869, Centre County, PA; d. Aft. 1905.

3. WILLIAM5 AYRES, JR. (WILLIAM4, JOHN3, WILLIAM2, SAMUEL1) was born March 08, 1823 in Harrisburg, PA, and died 1898. He married (1) ELEANOR CRISWELL 1846, daughter of HON. JAMES CRISWELL. She was born August 17, 1821, and died December 08, 1863 in McVeytown. He married (2) CATHARINE E. WATSON January 05, 1865. She was born Abt. 1842 in Canada. He married (3) CATHERINE "KATE" E. WILLIAMS September 07, 1876 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, daughter of HARVEY WILLIAMS and HANNAH CONDIT. She was born December 22, 1833 in Wayne County, Pennsylvania, and died in Buried McVeytown, Pennsylvania.

Notes for WILLIAM AYRES, JR.:

"commenced merchandising with his uncle, Hon. John C. Bucher, and removing to Philadelphia, entered the wholesale trade; he was

appointed by Gov. Wm. F. Johnston an Aid de Camp, with the rank of Lieut. Colonel; whilst in Major General Wm. F. Smith's Division of the

Army of the Potomac, in the Rebellion, Col. Ayres was captured on Bull Run battlefield, and confined in Libby prison, Richmond, Va.; he

was released April, 1862, under a "Parole d'honneur".

--------------------

Here are some of the words from a document obtained from the National Archives Record Group No. 249 Office of Commisary General of Prisoners Individual Records of Federal Prisoners of War... Two papers, somewhat contradictory...

MEMORANDUM FROM PRISONER OF WAR RECORDS.

 

Name. Ayres Wm Rank (Cit ?) State Pa Captured at Bull Run Va Mch 26, 1862, confined at Richmond, Va., Mch 30, 1862.

Second paper says:

MEMORANDUM FROM PRISONER OF WAR RECORDS.

Name Ayres, William (Cit? of North) Captured at Urbana M April 24, 1862, confined at Richmond, Va.

Paroled at Richmond, Va. April 19, 1862; reported at Camp parole, Md.

Released by Genl (Winders?) order April 19/62

---------------------

Listed as an Aide de Camp to General William Smith and in the "Regulars"

 

This may be the William Ayres referred to in the 1859 Philadelphia City Directory ...

Ayres, Wm., mer. 56 N 3d, h 1035 Vine

Thanks to Regina Klotz for this 1870 Philadelphia Census Lookup!!

Roll 1395, 28th District, 10th Ward, Phila

pg 245

AYRES, William, 47, fish dealer, 25000 pers estate, born PA, citizen

Kate, W, 28, keeping house, born Canada, mother & father foreign born

Watson, 2, born PA, mother foreign born

Watson, Thomas T, 25, coml agent, born Canada, mother & father foreign born, citizen

Ayres, Charles, 17, student, born Wisconson

Bucher, 14, attending school, born PA

Vance L, 11, attending school, born PA

Kelly, Margaret, 35, domestic servant, born Ireland, mother & father foreign born

Connolly, Sarah, 23, domestic servant, born Ireland, mother & father foreign born

Dougherty, Sarah, 30, domestic servant, born Ireland, mother & father foreign born

Presumably, the Thomas T. Watson listed above, was the brother of Catherine Ayres, wife of William.

This is assumed, since *both* parents are listed as foreign born.

 

Notes for CATHARINE E. WATSON:

Of Prince Edwards' Island.

Thanks to Regina Klotz for this 1870 Philadelphia Census Lookup!!

Roll 1395, 28th District, 10th Ward, Phila

pg 245

AYRES, William, 47, fish dealer, 25000 pers estate, born PA, citizen

Kate, W, 28, keeping house, born Canada, mother & father foreign born

Watson, 2, born PA, mother foreign born

Watson, Thomas T, 25, coml agent, born Canada, mother & father foreign born, citizen

Ayres, Charles, 17, student, born Wisconson

Bucher, 14, attending school, born PA

Vance L, 11, attending school, born PA

Kelly, Margaret, 35, domestic servant, born Ireland, mother & father foreign born

Connolly, Sarah, 23, domestic servant, born Ireland, mother & father foreign born

Dougherty, Sarah, 30, domestic servant, born Ireland, mother & father foreign born

Presumably, the Thomas T. Watson listed above, was the brother of Catherine Ayres, wife of William.

This is assumed, since *both* parents are listed as foreign born.

 

Notes for CATHERINE "KATE" E. WILLIAMS:

Mrs. Bottorff had for a maiden name, Williams.

Of Carlisle, PA.

Currently McVeytown is in Mifflin County, PA at latitude 40 degrees, 29 minutes, 57

seconds North, longitude 77 degrees, 44 minutes, 30 seconds West.

Called Kate W. Williams (spouse of Wm. Ayres Jr.) in AFN:V2Q8-MN. Also place of birth, date of birth, and place of marriage from that source. But corrected Catherine E. Williams comes from IGI Record Film No. 455304 and 447962 (ref 95272).

 

 

Children of WILLIAM AYRES and ELEANOR CRISWELL are:

10. i. MARY ELIZABETH6 AYRES, b. October 04, 1847, Philadelphia.

ii. JAMES CRISWELL AYRES, b. March 16, 1849; d. July 17, 1851.

iii. CHARLES CRISWELL AYRES, b. November 27, 1852.

Notes for CHARLES CRISWELL AYRES:

In the 1870 Philly Census, he is listed as born in Wisconsin.

11. iv. JACOB BUCHER AYRES, b. May 16, 1856, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

v. JOHN VANCE CRISWELL AYRES, b. June 07, 1859, Philadelphia; d. October 21, 1875.

Notes for JOHN VANCE CRISWELL AYRES:

Buried in Mt. Vernon cemetery.

Called Vance L. Ayres in the 1870 Philadelphia Census..

 

Child of WILLIAM AYRES and CATHARINE WATSON is:

vi. DR. WILLIAM WATSON6 AYRES, b. November 24, 1867, Philadelphia.

Notes for DR. WILLIAM WATSON AYRES:

"graduated at the National Medical school of the Columbian University, Washington city, March 20, 1890; residence and practice in same

city.".

4. SUSAN BUCHER5 AYRES (WILLIAM4, JOHN3, WILLIAM2, SAMUEL1) was born October 06, 1826 in Harrisburg, PA, and died October 07, 1861 in Harrisburg, PA. She married ANDREW J. JONES December 11, 1856 in Harrisburg, PA, son of ROBERT JONES and MARGARET WILLIAMSON. He was born 1803, and died January 13, 1867.

Notes for SUSAN BUCHER AYRES:

Buried in Harrisburg cemetery.

Or, died August 7, 1861?

Sang Alto, according to GBA in N & Q.

-------------

Mrs. Kingsford's School. - By George Bucher Ayres (b. 1829)

A contributor (N. & Q. iii.) to this interesting and valuable department having made reference to the young ladies' seminary of Mrs. Kingsford, at Harrisburg, I am reminded of one of its rolls. In the absence of date I fix it about 1839. It will be interesting to recall some of the names perhaps almost forgotten; to note those who are numbered among the silent dead of Kalmia; and to repeat the maiden-names of the majority who are to-day among the noble mothers (some may be grandmothers) of Harrisburg.

[in this list is Susan B. Ayres]

-------------

Notes for ANDREW J. JONES:

With parents Robert T. Jones and Margaret Williamson, emigrated to America 1806 from County Donegal, IRELAND. Settled in Bainbridge, Lancaster, PA.

Appointed Postmaster by President Taylor.

Buried in Harrisburg cemetery.

 

Children of SUSAN AYRES and ANDREW JONES are:

i. MARY ELLEN6 JONES, b. October 09, 1857; d. April 16, 1862.

ii. ANDREW J. JONES, b. October 05, 1859; d. May 26, 1860.

iii. SUSAN AYRES JONES, b. June 08, 1861; d. January 17, 1864.

5. GEORGE BUCHER5 AYRES (WILLIAM4, JOHN3, WILLIAM2, SAMUEL1) was born February 12, 1829 in Harrisburg, PA, and died Abt. 1906 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He married MARY ROBBINS SMITH October 10, 1867 in by Joseph R. VanDyke at Bride's Mother's House, daughter of SPENCER SMITH and MARY ROBBINS. She was born March 29, 1838 in Of Bloomsbury, New Jersey, and died February 01, 1878 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Notes for GEORGE BUCHER AYRES:

"an artist, and author of a work on painting; resides in Philadelphia" --Egle

"How to Paint Photographs" says two things in the early pages... Copyright George B. Ayres No. 2022 N. 11th St., Philadelphia, and "To My Talented Friend J. Augustus Beck, Artist, This Volume is Affectionately Dedicated by the Author.

----

Notes and Queries, Fourth Series, in Two Volumes, Volume 1 by Egle, says ...

THE HONOR WELL DESERVED.

The Dauphin County Historical Society at its regular meeting, 13th of April, elected George Bucher Ayres, Esq., of Philadelphia, an Honorary Member of that society, in token of their appreciation of his services in the history of his native city. It was a well-deserved tribute.

----

In one of the volumes of Notes & Queries, it says that George Bucher Ayres' address was 1719 North 18th St., Philadelphia.

 

 

George Bucher Ayres wrote an article (not specified) in a book reviewed

in Pen Gen Mag vol XXVII p 78. The book is Notes and Queries Historical

and Genealogical Chiefly Relating to Interior Pennsylvania Edited by

William Henry Egle, MD. Index to Main Families, Persons, Places and

Subject in Egle's Notes and Queries. Published by Baltimore: GPC 1970.- From Broderbund CD#213

Ayres, George B. State : PA

County : Montour Co.

Location : Danville Borough

Year : 1850

Page # 295

Just returned from [Williamsport]. library and they had the census microfilms there also, so I took a quick look. In the Danville Borough census for

1850 on pg. 295, George B. Ayres was listed on property #63 - which was a Hotel (didn't say which one). He was a 21 yr. old male, born in

Penna., occupation Telegrapher! - Dani Kimmel

1850 Census also has Smiths on the street.- Jane Hamilton.

Beginning 1845, George Bucher Ayres attended (as first enrollee) Partridge's Military School at Harrisburg. (Egle's Notes & Queries)

Egle himself was an enrollee! George was from Philadelphia at the time, and William Henry Egle was from Harrisburg.

------------------------

Franklin Repository and Transcript, August 15, 1860, p. 5, c. 1

The Franklin Railroad.

This excellent thoroughfare is now completed, and the second train of cars has been put upon the track. On Wednesday, the 1st inst., the regular opening of the Road took place. On that day the second train began to run. The running time, for the present, is as follows:

Leaving Hagerstown in the morning of every day, Sabbath excepted, at 7 o'clock, the first train to this place arrives in time to form a connection with the morning train for Harrisburg. The second train from Hagerstown leaves there at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, arriving here about half past four; but makes no connection with an eastern train. The first train for Hagerstown leaves Chambersburg at 11.15 A.M.--about fifteen minutes after the first train from Harrisburg arrives. The second train for Hagerstown leaves here at 5.10 P.M.--about ten minutes after the arrival of the evening train from Harrisburg.

The people along the route of the Franklin Railroad are under many obligations to A. J. Jones and James Dull, Esq's., of Harrisburg, and Jay Cook, Esq., and the Clarke brothers, of Philadelphia, for the substantial road they have had constructed. These men contributed largely to the so much desired result.

The company were very fortunate in securing the services of so excellent an Engineer as William Woods, Esq. If a less experienced Civil Engineer than he had been employed a very much inferior road might have been made; for, we have been informed, by those interested in the road, that a set of specifications were drawn up which, had they been followed, would have produced a vastly inferior road to that which has been made. The probability is that the specifications were drawn up by some person who knew very little more than we do about civil Engineering, and we do not know enough to enable us to lay a track less than one hundred yards in length--say from the turn-table of the Cumberland Valley Railroad to the new warehouse of Messrs. Wunderlich, Nead & Co.

The Franklin Railroad Company have been very fortunate in the selection of a General Agent--George B. Ayers, Esq. He is not only polite, accommodating and gentlemanly in his intercourse with the public, but he is an accomplished scholar, and a first-class man. The Conductor, Mr. John Miller, is deservedly popular with the people; his kindness and politeness are fully appreciated.

We notice that our spirited cotemparay, [sic] the Greencastle Pilot, has shown the necessity of a flag-station at the Brown's Mill Cross Roads--at Caufman's. This accommodation is greatly needed, and the Company stands in its own light every day it neglects this important station.

 

 

------------------------

Franklin Repository and Transcript, February 15, 1860, p.7, c. 1

The Franklin Railroad.

--At length this highway is opened up for the accommodation of the travelling public. After being cursed for nearly seventeen years with horse cars and a worn out Railroad, we were not surprised to find that the good people of our native town, Greencastle, were highly pleased to see the regular passenger train of cars entering their beautiful, thriving Borough, on last Monday, the 6th day of February, 1860.

On Wednesday, the last day of May, 1843, the last train of cars, propelled by steam, passed over the old road. On Thursday, June 1st, 1843, the first horse-car traveled over that old flat-bar, no-rail, rickety concern.

A few years since the people in the Southern part of this county, petitioned the Legislature for, and obtained, the passage of an act authorizing the sale of the dilapidated old road, the jest and by-work of the whole country, for the purpose of having it reconstructed. It was sold, but not re-laid. Within a year or two, in pursuance of further legislation, it was again sold. This time it fell into the hands of A.J. Jones, Esq., of Harrisburg, and others who have rebuilt it -substancially. To the indomitable perseverance of Mr. Jones are the people of this Valley indebted for the present substancial thoroughfare -full blasted, heavy railed, it is one of the best roads in the United States.

The Road is not yet completed to its terminus -Hagerstown, Md. The arrangement, therefore, for running to Greencastle is not of that permanent and satisfactory character which will be made as soon as the Road is finished throughout. There is but one train per day, leaving Chambersburg at 11.25 A.M., and, returning, leaves Greencastle at 1.40 P.M., remaining an hour and a half at the latter place.

Col. Lull, the polite superintendent of the Cumberland Valley Road, desirous of affording facilities for the transportation of freight, and for passengers to travel with comfort to and from Greencastle, made the above described arrangement -the only one that could be made for the present.

The gentlemanly conductor on the C.V. R.R., Levy McCormack, Esq., who served an apprenticeship on that same route, under the horse car arrangement; George B. Ayres, Esq., the polite, efficient general Agent for the Company, and Geo. W. Simmons, Esq., the unequalled Agent for the Adams Express Co., constitute a trio of good fellows, noble and true, all of them, upon whom devolve the duty of serving the public on the highway -The Franklin Rail Road. The more intercourse the people along the line of the road have with these gentlemen the better they will like them.

The first Train which passed over the road to Greencastle, consisted of nine heavily laden freight, and two passenger cars. The firm of C.W.Eyster, &Co., forwarding merchants of this place, have the credit of bringing down from Greencastle, the first loaded car -which was done by Monday's return trip.

--------------

The "Old Folks" first Grand Concert, Franklin Hall, Chambersburg

on Friday Evening, June 17th,: 1864.

For the benefit of the U. S. Christian Commission.

Musical Conductor - George B. Ayres.

PROGRAMME.

Part 1

1. Chorus - Song of the Old Folks.

2. Song - Happy be thy Dreams - George B. Ayres.

3. Quartet - Evangeline - Miss Snider, Mrs. McClure, Mr. McClure and Mr. McLenegan.

4. Solo - The Kiss- Miss Maggie Barnlitz.

5. Piano Solo -La Fille du Regiment - Nelle Halm

6. Comic Song - R. A. McClure.

7. Violincello (Left hand, without changing strings) Last Rose; Old Folks at Home - R. N. McClure

8. Quartet - "Oh, Gently Breathe" Misses Barnitz and Roberts. Messrs. McClure and Rebman.

Part 2

1. Chorus Bonnie Doon.

2. Solo and Flute - The Echo Song Miss Snyder and Mr. Ayres.

3. Comic Song - Mr. McFinnigan, Mr. Monyer.

4. Piano Solo - Lee Somnambuler - N'lle Halm.

5. Duet - Two Merry Girls - Miss Barnitz and Miss Roberts.

6. Quartet - Come Where My Love Lies Dreaming

7. Song - I'll be no Submissive Wife - Miss Maggie Barnitz.

8, Song -The Ivy Green - George Ayres.

9. Grand Finale - When this cruel War is Over - Solo - Miss Abbie Rankin.

------------------

The above three large sections are from the same source, as is apparent in looking at the webpages involved, the fact that the basic URL is the same, and a couple or more of the Surnames, such as Eyster, are mentioned in both instances. This would seem to indicate that George Bucher Ayres was also an accomplished musician. The railroad involvement, etc., is known for GBA.-VES

------------------

Here is another George Bucher Ayres book...

Ayres, George Bucher.

Historical sketch of Partridge's Military Institute at Harrisburg, Pa.,

1845-6-7 / by George B. Ayres. Harrisburg, Pa. : Telegraph Print. House, 1879

California State Library--Sutro

Address: Sutro Library

480 Winston Drive

San Francisco, CA 94132

World Wide Web: http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/gencoll/gencolsu.htm

Phone: (415) 731-4477

Fax: (415) 557-9325

E-Mail: sutro@library.ca.gov

Here is an excerpt, offering the Lincoln Portrait for sale by auction!!!

http://www.pacificbook.com/catalogs/curcat139-9.html

551. (Lincoln) Silver photograph of a young and beardless Abraham Lincoln printed in 1890s by George Ayres from a negative made in 1860. 8x6-1/2 in an oval wooden frame. Fresh and bright Abraham Lincoln photograph, depicting him without a beard. In May 1860, after his nomination for the Presidency there was an immediate demand for his picture, thus a commissioned artist took this photograph of the coming President. In 1866 George B. Ayres became the proprietor of Hesler Gallery in Chicago where he found the negative of the young Lincoln. 25 years later, triggered by a beardless Lincoln picture in Harper's magazine, he remembered his photographic relics and brought the negative to light again. It was used as the frontispiece in John Hay and John Nicolay Lincoln biography which first appeared in The Century in November 1886. Fine condition. (500/800)

--------------

Today, January 12, 2000, I found "a" print like, or the same, as the above, in the archives of Franklin Marshall University... (Copyright Date for the Franklin & Marshall Image, 1894 by George B. Ayres. Here is another description of the image and negative, found on another obsolete site:

Alexander Hesler (Springfield, Illinois): Abraham Lincoln

Albumen print, 6.5 x 8.5 inches, 1860

One of three photographs taken by Hesler during a sitting June 3, while Lincoln was campaigning for the presidency. Of these portraits Lincoln said, "That looks better and expresses me better than any I have ever see; if it pleases the people I am satisfied."

Lincoln's law partner, William Herndon, was more specific about this noble pose: "There is a peculiar curve of the lower lip, the lone mole on the right cheek, and a pose of the head so essentially Lincolnian; no other artist has ever caught it."

This print was made late in the nineteenth century by George B. Ayres. The negative for this image survives in the Smithsonian Institution, although it is now shattered.

--------------

By his own admission, GBA sang "basso." He also indicates in N & Q, that Eliza J. Ayres sang soprano.

In response to a post to Montour County PA:

Montour County Census: Had a short visit to National Archives today and looked up your reference. George B. Ayres appears on line 36. Following info is provided: (1850)

Age 21

Occupation: Telegrapher

Born: Pennsylvania

Living in Hotel in Danville (no other family is listed here) -Don Keller, email: DONKLR@aol.com - March 10, 1999.

GBA wrote a letter to a Mr. A. Boyd Hamilton, Esqr. from 636 Girard Avenue, Philadelphia, on March 21, 1896.

LDS Film No. 1903879 and 1761146

It should be noted that, though G.B. Ayres married a Mary Robbins Smith, there was, during his Montour County Telegrapher days, a neighboring family as follows (1850 Pa Census):

58 58 Jane Smith 49 F

Charlotte 22 F

Mary A. 13 F

63 63 Cornelius Garretson 58 M Tavern Keeper $6000

Mary 39 F

Matilda 23 F

Sarah 22 F

Maria 20 F

Henrietta 19 F

Mary 6 F

Fanny 1 F

John Robinson 29 M Teacher Ireland

George B. Ayres 21 M Telegrapher Pennsylvania

Geo. M. Leslie 26 M Clerk Scotland

G.W. Morgan 23 M Printer Pennsylvania

L.O. VanAlen 25 M Clerk New York

Jas. D. Strawbridge26 M Physician Pennsylvania

Joseph Doran 25 M Tailor NI

John S. Watson 48 M Nothing $18,000

 

Census Index: DE, DC, MD, PA, OH, VA, and WV, 1900 (Thanks to: Wendy realia@home.com for Index Lookup)- VES

Ayres, George B. State : Pennsylvania County : Philadelphia Location : 38th Ward Philadelphia Roll Number : 1479 Page : 71

Alexander Hesler of Springfield did take photos of Lincoln on June 3, 1860 and I have several books that print those - especially good in "Lincoln" by Kunhardt.- Brad [Hoch] 1104@mail.wideopen.net

Dear sir,

Your reference question concerning a photograph of Lincoln was refered to me. In Frederick Hill Meserve's and Carl Sandburg's catalog, The Photographs of Abraham Lincoln (Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1944) entries 25 and 26 are photograph by Alexander Hesler of a beardless Abraham Lincoln, taken in Springfield, Illinois on June 3, 1865. Entry 25 has the following caption:

"Mr. George B. Ayres after Hesler's death in 1865 obtained this negative and number 26, which were of cabinet size, and touched up 8" by 10" negatives made from the originals. They had a very wide distribution. In recent years these negatives were damaged in the mails; they are now in the Smithsonian Institution."

In Art Fact (an index of decorative art sold at auction in the past ten years) I found 22 prints made by Ayre from these negatives. For the most part, they sold for between $850 and $3,000. This is not necessarily an indication of what the piece you saw for sale on the internet is truly worth. A professional appraiser would have to determine that.

Many of the photographs listed in Art Fact were hand-tinted. Ayres, as you may know, was an expert in the field of hand-coloring photographs. In our library we have a copy of his book, How to paint photographs in water colors, (Philadelphia : Benerman & Wilson, 1870).

I hope this helps,

Lauren Lessing

Reference Librarian

[Ryerson & Burnham Libraries The Art Institute of Chicago]

*****************************************************************

A Letter concerning George B. Ayres, from an Ernie Morrison to Betsy Higby, and from thence to James Hoch:

[Note: Jim Hoch alludes to the fair possibility that George Washington may never have gone down the road listed in this letter.- VES.]

March 30, 1988

Dear Betsy:

Thank you so much for your kind note. One of the nice things

that has happened to me as a result of being a member of the Choral

Society and in writing Sing Harrisburg, Sing has been the chance to

work with and know wonderful people such as you. I appreciate your

comments and the thought very much. But your letter also contained

a surprise.

For years I have been interested in the circumstantial crossing

of paths unexpectedly, and your letter is another instance of this.

My next article for APPRISE (June), which I just started this week,

opens with several pages of material from George B. Ayres memoir

of Jenny Lind's appearance in Harrisburg. He was instrumental in

making the arrangements with the Locust Street Methodist Church -

the parent church of the present Grace Methodist - for the use of

their hall.

There is a paragraph, too, in my article dealing with George's

great-grandfather, William and his father - also named William. Old

William not only built the house that your husband's boss lives in

(and which I would like to see sometime), but also in 1781 built the

first road west across Peter's Mountain and through what was then called

"Saint Anthony's Wilderness." George Washington traveled on this road

when he led the militia west to quell the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794.

Old William came to Dauphin County in 1773 from Philadelphia County.

He died in 1784 when he accidentally drowned in Fishing Creek.

George's father, on the other hand, also gave the area a "first."

He was a highly respected member of the Dauphin County Bar and was

responsible as a city councilman for the introduction of water into

Harrisburg in 1841.

Although I have a lot of material written by George Ayres (but not

that which you sent), I do not have much about him. He did work for the

old Pennsylvania Telegraph in 1851 when Jenny Lind came to Harrisburg.

The Pennsylvania Telegraph, later the Harrisburg Telegraph, was one of

the great city newspapers at the turn of the century. It was the original

of the firm that just closed its doors several weeks ago.

Thanks again for your letter. I expect to see and hear you in

April and May.

Sincerely,

[signed] Ernie

1905 Philadelphia City Directory:

Ayres, G. Bucher, artist, 1512 N 15th

He is not to be found in the death index for 1904/05.- Georgeanne McPeters.

**********

From Dale Rossi DTRossi@aol.com

He moved to Buffalo in 1867 and then to Philadelphia PA in 1872 or 1873.

Listed in the 1872 Buffalo City Directory:

1872 Ayers, George B. 308 Main

(G.B. Ayers) Single view reported on RM, of loaded barge. "Artist."

Addressed NPA meeting in Chicago 3/19/1893 "...Mr. G. Ayers, speaking for E. & H.T. Anthony..." Moved to 1232 N. Sixth St., Philadelphia. [Phila Photo 1873 p.143]

**********

Ayres, Mary wife of George B. died 2/1/1878 in Philadelphia. [BuffLib. Catalogue]

Ayres, George B. "Old Time Militia Training," Transactions of the Historical Society of Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, 1 [1903]: 156-58.

1900 & 1901 & 1905 PCD:

Geo B artist 1710 Oxford in 1900

Geo B artist at 1719 N 18th in 1901

Ayres, G. Bucher, artist, 1512 N 15th

Notes for MARY ROBBINS SMITH:

From "ERIE CO., NY OBITUARIES AS FOUND IN THE FILES OF THE BUFFALO AND ERIE CO. HISTORICAL SOCIETY, compiled by Bill and Martha Reamy published 1992."

Mary Ayers, wife of Geo. B., formerly of Buffalo, NY..Feb. 1, 1878, in Philadephia.

From " MARRIAGES FROM BUFFALO NEWSPAPERS 1811-1884 by June Partridge Zintz. Published 1999.

AYRES, Geo. B. to Mary Robbins SMITH, Oct. 10, 1867.

The above was from a kind researcher doing a lookup for me from Erie Co., NY resources...- VES.

Marriage Notes for GEORGE AYRES and MARY SMITH:

From an unknown publication with this date and volume, the marriage announcement of G.B.A. and M.R.S.:

Oct. 30, 1867, Vol. XXX, No. 10 (1510)

Found on URL: http://home.att.net/~dennis.sutton/News/jan1867.htm

On the 10th inst., at the house of the bride's mother, by the Rev. Jos. R. Van Dyke, Mr. George B. Ayres of Buffalo, N.Y., to Miss Mary R. Smith, of Bloomsbury, N.J.

AYRES, George B. to Mary Robbins Smith, 10 Oct 1867 (B.C.A. 16 Nov 1867)

 

Children of GEORGE AYRES and MARY SMITH are:

i. EDITH LYON6 AYRES, b. February 05, 1875.

Notes for EDITH LYON AYRES:

There is, listed on Broderbund CD#322, the following, which may be a connection, or may be not:

Edith L. Ayres

Ansonia Township, New Haven , CT

Microfilm Roll # 142, Microfilm Pg #98

This was for the 1900 Census Index...

----------

 

ii. ANNIE SMITH AYRES, b. September 15, 1876; d. Aft. 1905.

Notes for ANNIE SMITH AYRES:

The newspaper was the Philadelphia Times and was dated June 13, 1895.- Elizabeth Lewnliz@aol.com

ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT

75th Term

GIRLS' HIGH SCHOOL

Wednesday, June 12, 1895 11 AM

Academy of Music, Broad and Locust Sts. Philadelphia, PA.

GRADUATES

 

SPECIALLY DISTINGUISHED

BENSON, Laura May

BRADLEY, Crissie S.

BROOMELL, Jeannette T.

CALDWELL, Omie E.

CASCADEN, Julia F.

COOK, Ethel

CRAWFORD, Elizabeth

DEETZ, Mary

DOYLE, Florence A.

ESBENSHADE, Mary

HAND, Helen

HOOVER, Helen

JOHNSON, Alice E.

KITSON, Anna

LODOR, Clara H.

MCBRIDE, Irene

MUELLER, Bertha J.

O'DONNELL, Mary

PATTERSON, Helen

PFAELZER, Hettie

REDLES, Helen L.

REEVES, Mabel E.

RUST, Lillie G.

SCOTT, Laura B.

SNYDER, Julia A.

STOTT, Jennie

TILLY, Gertrude E.

TOWNSEND, Elsie P.

WEBB, Sara

YERGER, Anna F.

DISTINGUISHED

ABERNETHY, Mary H.

ADAMS, Lilian

ALLEN, Ray I.

ARNELL, Mabel

ASTLEY, Mary I.

ATHA, Elizabeth

ATWOOD, Elizabeth W.

AYRES, Anne Smith

BACON, Bertice M.

BAKER, Mabel E.

BASSETT, Amelia L.

BAUMGARTEN, Elizabeth H.

BAYNE, Flora E.

BEATON, Margaret T.

BERLEMANN, Bertha

BIRCH, Margaret P.

BLUM, Emma

BONSALL, Alice R.

BORTEL, Anna E.

BROMER, Kate A.

BURTON, Florence

CAMPBELL, Mary L.

CHANDLER, Florence S.

CLAFFY, Eleanor V.

CLARENCY, Ellen

CLARK, Flora C.

CLIFT, Blanche

COCHRANE, Isabel L.

COLLINGSWOOD, Elizabeth

COX, Bertha F.

CROZIER, Anna J.

CUSHMORE, J. Elva

DALEY, Emma

DAVIS, Cynthia

DAVIS, Sarah

DECKER, Cora

DONAGHY, Emily

DOVEY, Hannah D.

DRAKE, Helen

DUNBAR, Jenny

ELLINGER, Lilian

EMHARDT, Amy

ERVIN, Alice Potter

ESHERICK, Edith

EVANS, Lillie F.

EVES, Helen

FARROW, Sidney

FEGELEY, Elsie

FISLER, Anna

FRY, Bertha

GARDNER, Irma

GEORGE, Mary

GIBB, Margaret

GIBSON, May

GILBERT, Hanna

GITHENS, Marie

GOLCHER, Ida

GOLDSMITH, Perla

GOODYEAR, Caroline

GRAHAM, Virginia

GUENTHER, Florence

HACKETT, Ella

HALEY, Emma

HALL, Emma

HAMILTON, Margaret

HAND, Edna

HARKINS, Emily

HAUBERT, Margaret M.

HAVERSTICK, Laura A.

HAYS, Jessie

HENRY, Marian

HOBEN, May

HOFFNER, Mary

HOUSE, Jessie

HOWARD, Emma

HUMPHREYS, Grace L.

HUNTER, Jane

HURLBURT, Adeline

ILLMAN, Adelaide T.

JOHNSON, Anna

JONES, Estelle

JONES, Mabel

JONES, Margaret

JONES, Mary S.

JORDAN, Lillian

JUMP, Mary

KAHL, Emma

KAUFFMAN, Anna

KELSO, A. B.

KEOGH, Elizabeth

KEILKOPF, M.

KINSEY, Helen F.

KLAUDER, Emma M.

KNAUFF, Theodora C.

KNEESHAW, May

KOENIG, Sarah

LAMBORN, Mary E.

LAMON, Eva

LANK, E. Ray

LAWTON, May

LEBERMAN, Elsa

LIGHTKEP, Fanny

MACFARLAND, Elizabeth

MAYER, Viola

McFARLAND, Caroline

McKENNA, Eleanor

McMAKIN, Jessie

McVICKAR, Edith G.

MILES, Mary

MILLER, Hannah

MINSTER, Blanche

MOYER, Elizabeth

NEWITT, Lily

NICE, Alice

NICHOLS, Elizabeth

NORTH, Elsie M.

NOSKA, Ella

NUSBAUM, Corrine

OESTMAN, May

OZIAS, Emily

PERKINS, Mary

PETERSON, Caroline

PHELPS, May

POLLITT, Anna

PRETTYMAN, Ada

PRICE, Edith

READ, Elizabeth T.

REICHNER, Florence M.

REID, Lida

REX, Sarah L.

REYES, Florence

RICKARDS, Kate

ROBERTS, Emma

RODGERS, Janet

ROEDELHEIM, Ernestine

ROSENSTEIN, Caroline

ROTHERMEL, Elizabeth

RUMBLE, F. Martin

RUSH, Sarah

RUSSELL, Margaret

SCHNEIDER, Katharine

SELLERS, Agnes

SHAW, Gertrude

SHEETS, Lena

SHEPHERD, May E.

SHILCOCK, Fanny

SIMPSON, Florence

SLUGG, Edna

SMITH, Anna R.

SMITH, Bertha

SMITH, Georgene W.

SNYDER, Emma

SPEAKMAN, Marie

SPROWLES, Sara

STEIN, Addie

STEIN, Blanche

STERN, Viola

STEWART, Mary I.

STEWART, Mary W.

STROUP, Josephine

STUBBS, May

SWEIGARD, Bertha

TAWRESEY, Mary G.

THOMPSON, Gertrude

THOMSON, Mary M.

THORNLEY, Mary

TIMANUS, Mary

TOLAN, Clara

ULMAN, Lilian

ULMER, Anna

VAN GUNTEN, Adele

VANSANT, Sara

VANSCIVER, Laura

WALKER, Anna W.

WALP, Ida E.

WALTER, Jeannette B.

WALTER, Mary R.

WALTERS, Ida G.

WALTON, Anna S.

WEATHERLY, Marguerite

WILDE, Mabel C.

WILKINSON, Anna

WILKINSON, Elizabeth

WILLIAMS, Eleanor B.

WILLIAMS, Lida P.

WILLIAMS, Susan E.

WILLS, Bessie S.

WILSON, Florence

WINNAMORE, Jessie R.

WOLFE, Esther E.

WORTHINGTON, Elizabeth

WRIGHT, Miriam

 

GRADUATES

ADAMS, Edna

ALDERFER, Catharine

ALDRED, Martha

ANDERSON, Laura M.

ANDERSON, Margaret L.

ANDERSON, Nellie E.

ANDREWS, Grace T.

ASHBRIDGE, Catharine S.

ATKINSON, Catharine

AUER, Emma

BARBE, Louise F.

BARRITT, Katharine

BEATTY, Anna E.

BINGHAM, Susanna, R.

BISHOP, Evora

BOELKE, Ida

BOLING, Sara M.

BOULAND, Mary

BOWMAN, Caroline L.

BRADLEY, Marian E.

BRANDWOOD, Sara E.

BRINES, Etta

BRINGHURST, Helen

BROWN, Eleanor S.

BROWN, Olivia G.

BUCHANAN, Florence A.

BUCHANAN, Minnie,

BURKE, Villetta L.

BURNWOOD, Anna L.

BUSSIER, Elizabeth

CATHER, Bertha E.

CHEW, Elizabeth B.

CLARK, Jean

CLARKE, A. Lulu

CLIFF, Hortense I.

CLOUDS, Blanche H.

CODY, Mae E.

CRAIG, Laura,

CULBERTSON, Margery A.

DALLAS, Mary

DAY, Elizabeth B. (my grandmother)

DEGERBERG, Caroline E.

DE HAAN, Jenny

DE HAVEN, Emily C.

DELP, Bertha G.

DONALDSON, Elizabeth J.

DOWNEY, Mary E.

DUDDY, Mary

DUHRING, Fanny L.

DUNLAP, Helen M.

EDGER, Regina E.

ELLINGER, Stella R.

EYRE, Jane

FILEMYR, Selena

FOREMAN, Virginia C.

FRAME, Etta A.

FREEMAN, Florence

GAMON, Martha

GEARY, Blanche I.

GEISSEL, Lulu C.

GIBBS, Florence E.

GILL, Mary

GILLESPIE, Elizabeth B.

GLASS, Martha

GOBRIGHT, Marie

GOODFELLOW, Mary F.

GORDON, Lucy

GOUCHER, Nellie

HAINES, Laura B.

HAMBACHER, Bertha

HARKNESS, Mary K.

HARLEY, Isabel

HARRIS, Anna E.

HART, Hattie P.

HASSINGER, Martha L.

HELLERMAN, Emily

HENDRICKSON, J. L.

HENRIS, Helen

HETHERINGTON, Fredericka

HETZELL, L.S.

HIBBS, Edith

HIMES, M. Lilian

HIRD, Martha

HOFFMAN, Netta

HOY, Jennie S.

HUGHES, Julia

HUNGERBUEHLER, Alma

HUNSICKER, B. A.

HUNSICKER, Grace

HUNT, Irene L.

HUNTER, Irene S.

HUSTON, Elizabeth S.

INGRAM, N.A.

IRONS, A. Marian

JACKSON, Cora M.

JACKSON, Mary E.

JOHNSON, Grace W.

JONES, Laura C.

KEELY, Abbie

KEEN, Maud

KELLY, Mae

KELLY, Rosamond

KENNEY, Grace

KETTLER, Sophia

KIMBLE, Blanche

KIMMEL, Ida

KINKADE, Elizabeth

KISTER, Bertha

KURTZ, Lottie

LAICHER, Anna

LAMON, Emily

LEE, Edna

LEPPER, Lilian,

LIPMAN, Maud

LITTLER, Clare

LONG, H. L.

LONG, Margaret

LOREAUX, Ruth

LOVELAND, Emily

LUMMIS, Florence

MAC DONALD, Anna

MAC FARLAND, Rosalie

MAC GOWAN, M. Elizabeth

MAGUIRE, Emily

MAIZE, Nellie,

MALOY, Elizabeth

MANDERSON, Mabel

MARCER, Emma

MARTIEN, Anna

MARTIN, Florence

MASON, Mae C.

MATHEWS, Alice

MC BRIDE, Elizabeth C.

MC CAUGHEY, Margaret

MC CLEAN, Anna

MC COY, N. F.

MC DOWELL, Belle H.

MC DOWELL, Helen P.

MC ELWEE, Fanny M.

MC GRATH, Margaret M.

MC KEAG, Mabel E.

MC KEEVER, Emma L.

MC LAUGHLIN, Ida

MC NICHOL, Elizabeth V.

MC NICHOL, Stella R.

MEANEY, Anna R.

MELLINGER, Katharine M.

MILLER, Louise

MILLER, Marnia E.

MILLER, May F.

MILLER, Olive V.

MILLIGAN, Ella M.

MILLIKEN, Emma G.

MITCHELL, M. Ada

MORROW, Jenny

MOYER, Mildred

MULHOLLAND, Maria C.

MYERS, Florence

NAGEL, Marie C.

NAULTY, Julia

NEBEKER, Myrtle L.

NEELY, Laura W.

NEILD, Anna

NELSON, Jane

NEWLIN, Gertrude E.

NICHOLS, May S.

NICHOLSON, Anna E.

NORRIS, Mabel

NUTTALL, Sarah G.

O'DONNELL, Alice M.

OFNER, Bertha

PARK, Marie E.

PARKER, Grace

PARKER, Mary A.

PARSONS, Helen W.

PATTON, Janet G.

PAXON, Bertha R.

PHELAN, Sarah C.

PIDJEON, Dorothy L.

PLATT, Effie A.

POLLOCK, Gertrude M.

PORTEUS, Helen

REIFSNYDER, Agnes B.

REX, Mary C.

RHEINER, Florence E.

RICKARD, Minerve

ROBB, Anna J.

ROBERTS, M. Lilian

RONEY, Loretta V.

ROUNDS, Lena H.

RYAN, Virginia A.

SHOALES, Josephine E.

SCHOPP, Marie L.

SCHREINER, Florence G.

SCULL, Mary S.

SERVICE, Dorothy E.

SHANAHAN, Elizabeth

SHARP, Lily

SHAW, Elizabeth

SHORT, Ella P.

SIMPSON, Sara B.

SKILLING, Marie

SLOAN, Helen

SMITH, Anna T.

SMITH, L. Alma

SMITH, Martha

SMYLIE, Edna B.

SOMMER, Charlotta

SOUNDER, Miriam

SPARKS, Evelyn M.

SPEAR, Edith

SPEAR, Rebecca

SPRACKLEN, Memma

STANDFORD, Julia E.

STARRETT, Laura M.

STEEL, Alma B.

STEELMAN, Alice

STEIN, Celia

STEINBEISSER, F. Henrietta

STEWART, Lily Barr

STEWART, Rebecca

STEWART, Susanna

STOCKMAN, Margaret

STOKER, Florence M.

STRONG, Julia

STRYKE, Mary C.

SUNDHEIM, Jenny

SUPLEE, M. Laura

SUPLEE, Sarah Y.

TAGGART, Bertha

THOMPSON, Theresa

THORP, Menona M.

THRELFALL, Clara

TOOMES, Jessie

TOTHILL, Bertha E.

TOURISON, Eleanor

TREACY, Frances M.

TURNER, Julia M.

TYSON, Ethelean

WARDELL, Fanny K.

WEED, M. Louella

WEINTRAUB, Georgine E.

WEISS, Camilla T.

WELSH, Teresa

WENZELL, Bertha

WHITAKER, Esther

WILKINSON, Mary C.

WILLIAMS, Flora E.

WILLIAMS, Marie C.

WILLIAMSON, Elizabeth

WILSON, Jean B.

WINPENNY, Jenny

WOODASON, Caroline F.

WOODS, Jenny

WOODS, Sarah M.

YOUNG, Mabel

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Tanguy

 

----------

From a different Elisabeth comes this:

Vince -

Girls' High still exists. It is The Philadelphia High School for Girls, and is a public school. It was founded in 1848 as the Philadelphia Normal School. It was originally a teacher training school. From 1854-1876 the school was located on Sargent Street (now Spring Street) between 9th & 10th. In 1893 the Normal School split from the HS and moved to their own building at 13th & Spring Garden. Girls' High was located at 17th & Spring Garden by this time (not sure when they moved).In 1932-33 a new building was built at the 17th & Spring Garden location (currently the Julia R. Masterman School). During that year Girls' High students were split between the Normal School and the

Grant Building at 17th & Pine. In 1958 The Philadelphia HS for Girls moved to its current location at Broad St. & Olney Avenue.

Here is contact information for the Alumnae Association:

Alumnae Association

c/o The Philadelphia High School for Girls

1400 West Olney Avenue

Philadelphia, PA 19141

(215) 276-5258

There was a directory published in 1998 with class lists for every year from 1923, and partial information from years before 1923.

Hope this helps,

Elisabeth

----------

1905 Philadelphia City Directory says (suely of GBA's own daughter): Ayres, Anne, boarding, 1512 N 15th [Note: This means she was still single at the time.- VES.].

6. ELIZA JANE5 AYRES (WILLIAM4, JOHN3, WILLIAM2, SAMUEL1) was born January 10, 1831, and died May 10, 1879. She married SAMUEL LYTLE ADDAMS September 23, 1852 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania by William R. DeWitt, son of SAMUEL ADDAMS and ELIZABETH HARKNESS. He was born January 19, 1821 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died May 22, 1881.

Notes for ELIZA JANE AYRES:

Married by: Rev. Dr. Wm. R. Dewitt.

Buried in the Shippensburg cemetery, Cumberland Co., PA. Buried in "ostentatious plot" [Jim Hoch] with the Hoch's.

The Addams Cemetery plot is located in The Spring Hill Cemetery which is in Shippensburg, PA. Shippensburg is along Interstate 81, about fifteen minutes north of the Maryland, Pennsylvania border. The Addams plot is located maybe one hundred feet away from most of my ancestors. Our families seem to pass so close; but, without a direct connection.

Eliza Jane Ayres Addams 1831-1879, wife of Samuel L. Addams 1821-1881. My memory tells me that Eliza was the daughter of the John Ayres that lived in my old house. She would have been a sister to the Elder William Ayres (the politician). Beyond that, I do not know anything about her or the Addams family. I suspect that the Shippensburg Historical Society has more information regarding the Addams family because the stones and layout of the cemetery plot are impressive. The whole picture suggests a family of local importance.- James Hoch, private communication, July 24, 1999.

Notes for SAMUEL LYTLE ADDAMS:

Of Cumberland Co.

Buried in the Shippensburg cemetery.

Marriage Notes for ELIZA AYRES and SAMUEL ADDAMS:

Presbyterian marriage. Performed by William R. DeWitt in Harrisburg, PA, with Date of Registration 23 Sept 1852, Date of Wedding 23 Sept. 1852 and Signature of the Register by Jno. Fox Jr Deputy Registrar. Page 7 Dauphin Co. Marriage Registration 1852-1855 as recorded for James Hoch by Molly Ulsh and Fran Hileman on July 15, 1990.

 

Children of ELIZA AYRES and SAMUEL ADDAMS are:

12. i. WILLIAM6 AYRES, SR. ADDAMS, b. May 12, 1853.

ii. MARY ADDAMS, b. May 12, 1853; m. DAVID T. HOLLAND, March 06, 1879.

Notes for MARY ADDAMS:

Twin.

7. JOHN BEGGS5 AYRES (WILLIAM4, JOHN3, WILLIAM2, SAMUEL1) was born February 27, 1835 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and died January 13, 1890 in Reynoldsville, Pennsylvania. He married MATILDA SCOTT October 27, 1858 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, daughter of FREDERICK SCOTT and ANN HERMAN. She was born July 14, 1836 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

Notes for JOHN BEGGS AYRES:

A master mechanic on the Allegheny Valley Railroad.

Birth Date may have been 1835 ... Egle uses both dates in his report, in different places.

If this was John Bucher Ayres, then, as Theo. B. Klein says in "Notes & Queries Relating to Pennsylvania", Edited by Egle,

the Annual Volume of 1900:

 

" The Friendship [fire company] had as leaders from time to time Alexander Ramsey, H. Murray Graydon, Alexander Roberts,

Chambers Dubbs, William Piper, Samuel C. Wiestling, J. Bucher Ayres, Isaac Keagy, Amos Cleckner, George Hoyer, Bob Vance,

Jacob Boyd and others..."

The Article cited above, was entitled SOME HOT TIMES In the Old Town - The Fire Boys Between The Years 1837 and 1871.

It also says that, the Friendship company, one of several, was located in the rear of the old Court House on the county lot.

AFN: V2Q6-QW

Did you know that John Ayres's middle name was Beggs? This is the John who married Matilda Scott and begat GBA. - Fran Ayres.

Notes for MATILDA SCOTT:

I was told she was an avid reader.- Fran Ayres (her great grandmother).

 

Children of JOHN AYRES and MATILDA SCOTT are:

i. SUSAN BUCHER6 AYRES, b. November 12, 1862.

13. ii. MARYLILE AYRES, b. January 01, 1865.

iii. WILLIAM FREDERICK AYRES, b. January 20, 1867.

iv. ROBERTA AYRES, b. April 11, 1869.

Notes for ROBERTA AYRES:

Mother told me that my Aunt Roberta was married to a Welch.- Susan Satoris.

Mother me that my Aunt Roberta and my Aunt Susan Bucher Ayres used to feed the hungry men or sometimes families back in the 1920's. She said hungry people knew which houses would invite them for a meal. It tied in with my Aunt Roberta's volunteering as a Travelers Aid.- Susan Satoris.

14. v. GEORGE BUCHER AYRES, b. May 14, 1871, Oil City Pennsylvania, or (LDS) Harrisburg.

vi. CHARLES SCOTT AYRES, b. November 28, 1874.

Notes for CHARLES SCOTT AYRES:

The letter below relates to a photograph of the women who were part of Charles Scott Ayres life...

Vince,

Any dates I have for the b[irths] - d[eaths]'s of these people (my Dad's uncle and aunts and grandmother) come from LDS (and I don't have my LDS info here, so I relied on dates from your website) Charles Scott Ayres, (my Dad's Uncle "Scott"), was one of 7 children of John Beggs Ayres and Matilda Scott. In the group photo are included: his mother, Matilda (middle front), his sister, Susan Bucher Ayres (far right), another sister, either Jane Allen Ayres or Roberta Ayres (I hope Susan can help positively identify this woman as Jane was her grandmother, and any of the other unidentified women), and standing behind Matilda to the left is her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Charles Scott Ayres.

 

According to your site : Matilda Scott Ayres b. 14 JUL 1836

Susan Bucher Ayres b. 12 NOV 1862

Jane Allen Ayres and Roberta Ayres were b. in 1877 and 1869 respectively. - Fran Ayres.

 

15. vii. JANE ALLEN AYRES, b. November 22, 1877, Reynoldsville, Pennsylvania; d. February 28, 1934, Cleveland, Ohio.

 

Generation No. 3

 

8. CLEONIE6 AYRES (BUCHER5, WILLIAM4, JOHN3, WILLIAM2, SAMUEL1) was born September 25, 1855 in Memphis, Tennessee, and died Aft. 1891. She married JACOB BUCHER AYRES January 05, 1887, son of WILLIAM AYRES and ELEANOR CRISWELL. He was born May 16, 1856 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Notes for CLEONIE AYRES:

Orphan's Court Marriage License Index - 1885-1916 lists:

Cleonie Ayres #8663 along with J. Bucker Ayres (the "k" probably being a misspelling).- Lookup courtesy Jane Hamilton.

Notes for JACOB BUCHER AYRES:

For marriage license through Orphan's Court, see entry for Cleonie.

NOTE!!! Marriage License Index lists this one as Bucker J. Ayres. Or, I should interpret, Bucher Jacob Ayres!!! Not Jacob Bucher Ayres!!!- Vince.

LDS gives a variant date...

Jacob Bucher Ayres

+Cleonie Ayres

m May 1, 1887 Phila.

File #1903554

LDS Internet

1910 Pennsylvania Miracode Index says:

State: PENN

County: McKeesport

Enumeration District: 0126

Name Jacob Ayers

Relation: Husband

Color: W

Age: 54

Birth Place: PENN

Visit: 0351

Relatives: Wife Cleonie 55, Tennessee; Daughter Alice L 18, PENN; Sister Mary E Mazurie 62 PENN

 

Children of CLEONIE AYRES and JACOB AYRES are:

i. CLEON7 AYRES, b. April 04, 1888; d. August 11, 1888.

ii. ALICE LYON AYRES, b. December 19, 1891.

Notes for ALICE LYON AYRES:

Is this the Alice Ayres referred to in the Orphans Court Philadelphia Marriage License Index, which says:

Ayres, Alice, m. 1902 to a Cowden. #152793 ?.

9. BUCHER6 AYRES, JR. (BUCHER5, WILLIAM4, JOHN3, WILLIAM2, SAMUEL1) was born November 18, 1869 in Centre County, PA, and died Aft. 1905. He married MAY THATCHER HARLAN October 12, 1892 in Philadelphia, PA, daughter of GEORGE HARLAN and ELLEN ENTREKEN. She was born August 29, 1870 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Notes for BUCHER AYRES, JR.:

Machinery.

Married "by Rev. Charles H. Richards".

The Philadelphia City Directory, 1890 lists a Bucher Ayres as living at 805 N. 17th

#54692 Marriage License Orphan's Court Philadelphia Marriage License Index. Married 1892.

1885 - 1916

1905 Philadelphia City Directory lists:

AYRES, Bucher salesman h 1433 N 15th (This is near his Uncle George Bucher Ayres, in the same year, also on 15th street, assuming that it was not Bucher Ayres Sr., who, logically, and with his past, would not have been young enough or geared to being a salesman.- VES.)

This could apply to this Bucher Ayres, or it could apply to his father, or, for that matter, in a sense, to both:

For Centre County, there is a farm listed in the National Register, on a Bucher Ayres farm, Ferguson Township at Whitehall Rd., SW Pine Grove Mills, listed 1980, as seen on the world-wide web at: http://www.centrecountyhistory.org/urlist.htm (or possibly html).- VES.

 

Child of BUCHER AYRES and MAY HARLAN is:

i. DOROTHY HARLAN7 AYRES, b. August 25, 1894, Swarthmore, PA.

10. MARY ELIZABETH6 AYRES (WILLIAM5, WILLIAM4, JOHN3, WILLIAM2, SAMUEL1) was born October 04, 1847 in Philadelphia. She married JAMES VICTOR MAZURIE April 30, 1866, son of JAMES MAZURIE and SARA LESHER. He was born November 23, 1838 in Philadelphia, and died March 23, 1890.

Notes for JAMES VICTOR MAZURIE:

Buried in Mount Peace cemetery, Philadelphia.

Mt. Peace is at 31st and Lehigh 19132- Gene Stackhouse.

Mazurie seems to be the correct name from online, but Mazuril also seems correct from other sources!- VES.

 

Children of MARY AYRES and JAMES MAZURIE are:

i. ELLEN CRISWELL7 MAZURIE, b. September 25, 1873, Philadelphia.

ii. HENRY ROUMFORT MAZURIE, b. February 14, 1867, Philadelphia.

iii. WILLIAM AYRES MAZURIE, b. February 01, 1870, Warren, Ohio; m. BERNICE APPLEGATE, October 16, 1895; b. May 26, 1870.

Notes for BERNICE APPLEGATE:

Source of name and birth date Applegate Genealogy Website! Bernice was also obtained (first name only) from the 1910 Miracode Pennsylvania Census.- VES.

iv. JAMES VICTOR MAZURIE, b. December 11, 1875, Philadelphia.

v. MARY BUCHER MAZURIE, b. November 16, 1877, Philadelphia.

11. JACOB BUCHER6 AYRES (WILLIAM5, WILLIAM4, JOHN3, WILLIAM2, SAMUEL1) was born May 16, 1856 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He married CLEONIE AYRES January 05, 1887, daughter of BUCHER AYRES and JANE LYON. She was born September 25, 1855 in Memphis, Tennessee, and died Aft. 1891.

Notes for JACOB BUCHER AYRES:

For marriage license through Orphan's Court, see entry for Cleonie.

NOTE!!! Marriage License Index lists this one as Bucker J. Ayres. Or, I should interpret, Bucher Jacob Ayres!!! Not Jacob Bucher Ayres!!!- Vince.

LDS gives a variant date...

Jacob Bucher Ayres

+Cleonie Ayres

m May 1, 1887 Phila.

File #1903554

LDS Internet

1910 Pennsylvania Miracode Index says:

State: PENN

County: McKeesport

Enumeration District: 0126

Name Jacob Ayers

Relation: Husband

Color: W

Age: 54

Birth Place: PENN

Visit: 0351

Relatives: Wife Cleonie 55, Tennessee; Daughter Alice L 18, PENN; Sister Mary E Mazurie 62 PENN

 

Notes for CLEONIE AYRES:

Orphan's Court Marriage License Index - 1885-1916 lists:

Cleonie Ayres #8663 along with J. Bucker Ayres (the "k" probably being a misspelling).- Lookup courtesy Jane Hamilton.

 

Children are listed above under (8) Cleonie Ayres.

12. WILLIAM6 AYRES, SR. ADDAMS (ELIZA JANE5, WILLIAM4, JOHN3, WILLIAM2, SAMUEL1) was born May 12, 1853. He married ALICE J. LAWTON, daughter of ROBERT LAWTON and ELOUISA. She was born January 12, 1857, and died November 30, 1888.

Notes for WILLIAM AYRES, SR. ADDAMS:

Banker

Buried in the Shippensburg cemetery.

Notes for ALICE J. LAWTON:

Buried in the Shippensburg cemetery.

 

Child of WILLIAM AYRES and ALICE LAWTON is:

i. WILLIAM7 AYRES, JR. ADDAMS, b. 1872; d. 1944; m. LOUISE W..

Notes for WILLIAM AYRES, JR. ADDAMS:

Buried in Spring Hill Cemetery. Shippensburg, PA..

13. MARYLILE6 AYRES (JOHN BEGGS5, WILLIAM4, JOHN3, WILLIAM2, SAMUEL1) was born January 01, 1865. She married WILLIAM H. SNYDER June 21, 1892 in at home in Reynoldsville, Pa..

Notes for WILLIAM H. SNYDER:

Of Renovo, PA

 

Child of MARYLILE AYRES and WILLIAM SNYDER is:

i. HELEN AYRES7 SNYDER, b. August 28, 1893.

14. GEORGE BUCHER6 AYRES (JOHN BEGGS5, WILLIAM4, JOHN3, WILLIAM2, SAMUEL1) was born May 14, 1871 in Oil City Pennsylvania, or (LDS) Harrisburg. He married MARGARET R. MOONEY 1897 in Pennsylvania. She was born December 20, 1879.

Notes for GEORGE BUCHER AYRES:

My Aunt Blanche, the widow of my dad's brother, may know if it might have been him. It's amazing that you have access to so much info. Although the LDS lists his birthplace as Harrisburg, according to my Aunt's bible record it was Oil City, Penn. -Fran Ayres

Notes for MARGARET R. MOONEY:

Birth date from word of mouth: Penny Ayres Styranka

 

Children of GEORGE AYRES and MARGARET MOONEY are:

i. KATHERINE BELL7 AYRES, b. September 22, 1898; d. February 1983.

Notes for KATHERINE BELL AYRES:

Kate and I shared a love for literature (including the Bible), poetry, philosophy, mysticism and alternative health).- Fran Ayres.

Birth date was 9/22/1897 or 9/22/1898, no children: Penny Ayres Styranka

ii. JOHN BUCHER AYRES, b. March 24, 1906; d. Bef. September 1999; m. (1) KATHLEEN MESSER; m. (2) JUDITH ZUSCIN, July 06, 1940; b. March 30, 1916, Cleveland, Ohio.

Notes for JOHN BUCHER AYRES:

Married more than once.- Fran Ayres.

Born March 24, 1906, had 3 children: Penny Ayres Styranka

Deceased now: Penny Ayres Styranka

iii. ROBERTA JANE AYRES.

Notes for ROBERTA JANE AYRES:

Married, but had no children.- Fran Ayres.

iv. WILLIAM CHARLES AYRES, b. June 04, 1911; d. August 1984.

Notes for WILLIAM CHARLES AYRES:

Had no children.- Fran Ayres.

v. RALPH WALDO AYRES, b. September 17, 1914; d. Bef. September 1999; m. CLARE WINIFRED KEARNEY, October 24, 1936; b. November 19, 1913.

Notes for RALPH WALDO AYRES:

His mother requested that he be named after Emerson.- Fran Ayres

Deceased now, but born September 1915: Penny Ayres Styranka.

15. JANE ALLEN6 AYRES (JOHN BEGGS5, WILLIAM4, JOHN3, WILLIAM2, SAMUEL1) was born November 22, 1877 in Reynoldsville, Pennsylvania, and died February 28, 1934 in Cleveland, Ohio. She married JOSEPH RAY DEVENY Bet. 1905 - 1910. He was born in Of Lorraine, Ohio.

Notes for JANE ALLEN AYRES:

My mother has bad memories of her father and doesn't want to talk much about him , others have also tried to dig for information on him.- Susan Satoris, referring to her mother, the daughter of Jane Allen Ayres.

Notes for JOSEPH RAY DEVENY:

Joseph DeVeny was one of 5 children.- Susan Satoris.

My mother, Elisabeth DeVeny Little, says her mother was born in Reynoldsville ... Pennsylvania, and she died in Cleveland, Ohio. As I mentioned before she was only 57 years old in 1934. Now, she was married to a banker named Joesph Ray DeVeny who was from Lorraine, Ohio. My mother has bad memories of her father and doesn't want to talk much about him.- Susan Satoris.

 

Child of JANE AYRES and JOSEPH DEVENY is:

i. ELISABETH7 DEVENY.

 

 

 

 

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